‘Use your talents’ monologue

I wrote this monologue as part of a production at my church.

 

 

Talents. Gifts. Smarts. Forte.

They all mean the excellence.

The brilliance.

The intelligence.

Ingenuity. Of God.

Placed and positioned carefully and precisely in your life. For a reason.

God is not random. God is not man to be random; without reason.

Heard the phrase ‘everything happens for a reason’, well it does.  

You can sing to bless and impact people.

You can dance to bless and relate to people.

You can speak well to bless and motivate people.

You can write well to inspire people.There was a precise reason and plan for you and your life.

So.

Who are you to decide to sit back and ignore that divine path set apart especially for you? Who are you to say no to the almighty God? Who are you? And you might be saying, Paula I’m not saying no to God. But you are. You really are.

We are Christians.

Which means we are called to be part of God’s large scale extravagant plan to bring the whole world to Him. To bring the whole population, to know Him, to want Him, just as we do.

That’s my mission.

That’s our mission.

That should be your mission.

Are you using your talent in the house of God?

 

 

Peace&Love

Paula ox’

 

No-Foundation March – the movement

Make-up is not for the insecure girls.

As a kid, growing up, I watched my mum and aunties dress up and put on make-up to look their best for church on Sunday or for an outing. At eleven or twelve I had decided that you can only be beautiful if you put on ‘powder’ or ‘blusher’. By the time I entered high school, all the girls I knew owned their own lip-gloss or mascara and I felt that because I didn’t own one myself, I wasn’t as pretty. Luckily, at that age, I was quite oblivious, so I didn’t really care. But the sad truth is, I genuinely believed make-up fixes you, and suddenly makes you beautiful. I used to look forward to weddings and parties just because my aunties and mum would let me wear a bit of make-up. (I looked dreadful, by the way. Something about blue eye shadow just isn’t right… luckily, you will NEVER pictures)

I’d like to believe that I’ve grown up quite a bit since then, especially because I totally have a new view on make-up and beauty. I love make up and wear it nearly every day. I don’t wear it because it makes me ‘pretty’, I wear it because I like how it looks on me. Simple as. There really isn’t anything more behind it. People think way too deeply when it comes to things like make-up. As the risk of sounding ghetto, ‘it’s not that deep, mate.’ It’s really not.

The make-up doesn’t put on the person, the person puts on the make-up. Some people have scars and blemishes on their face and they feel more confident with make-up on. I genuinely, whole-heartedly believe there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. Doing that is not insecurity, its survival. You don’t know their story, their reasoning behind it all. The same people, who bash girls for wearing make-up, are the same people who will bash girls for not having flawless skin. Like for real, make up your mind (excuse the pun;).

Back to the main point of this post, I’ve decided to try something new this month of MARCH. I am not going to wear any foundation on my face for the whole month. I don’t really wear a lot of foundation in general, because my skin is quite clear, but nevertheless, it’s all for the movement.

No-foundation March is a movement I thought about when I became concerned about the perception of make-up. Some of my friends hate make-up with a passion, and some are in a committed relationship with make-up. I love how make-up can be used to enhance your beauty and how it gives you the freedom to look like how you want to. However, I can live without it. I love glamming up, but truth be told, I do not the time and money (all the good stuff are so expensive) to care so deeply about an inanimate object.

So this movement is to support girls who feel like their make-up is them. It’s not. You are you, beautiful you. The make-up is something that’s in your control. This movement is also for girls who hate make-up. You are beautiful and flawless, with or without make-up.

Finally, this is a personal movement, so I’d like to personally invite you to join in. Don’t wear foundation for a day or two, or a week or follow me and do the whole month. It’s up to you. And just to make it crystal clear, I will be wearing other make-up items; I just won’t be wearing foundation.

Join the movement - #NoFoundationMarch

On Twitter, Instagram and Keek: @PaulaPaceSetter

#NoFoundationMarch

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Peace&Love.

Paula ox’

Book review – Leona Lewis’ ‘Dreams’

 

I’m not usually a fan of autobiographies or biographies, but Leona Lewis has single-handedly changed that idea with this one book – ‘Dreams’. Unlike, other celebs, Leona didn’t fill the book with a million-and-one facts about herself and her life, she briefly outlined her story of how she began to live her dreams, hence the title. ‘Dreams’ is an autobiography, which means Leona wrote it entirely from her own perspective and in her own words. I feel like this helps to produce that personal atmosphere which is present throughout the whole book. It is definitely easier to connect to an autobiography than a biography – in my opinion.

For those of you that don’t know, Leona Lewis is a British singer that came to stardom when she won The X Factor (UK) in 2006. The X Factor is a word-widely televised singing contest which has become increasingly popular as it gives normal everyday people the opportunity to live their dreams. Many countries have different adaptations of the show e.g. The X Factor USA in America.

‘Dreams’ was first published in 2009. I finished this book in about two hours because I literally could not put it down. No joke. You know when people say that a book was so good that they couldn’t put it down; well yes. I suffered from this because I would not put the book down. I felt like this was because Leona told the story directly herself, making it a lot more engaging than if someone else has written it. As you read, you hear her voice talking to you, telling you her story personally. Very few books have ever made me feel so up and close with the person. Leona Lewis is genuinely a gorgeous person, inside and out.

Also, I think Dean Freeman, the photographer and creative director of the book, is so crazy talented at what he does. As I mentioned before, one good thing about this book is how short it is. The ‘writing’ takes up less than 95 pages, making it an extremely easy read. Personally, I could have finished it on a long car journey or a flight to Paris (bear in mind that I live in London, which is only a 45 minute flight from Paris. I would know, I went there last summer). The rest of the book is filled with pictures, taken by Dean Freeman. I’m someone who loves pictures, taking them, modelling in them and looking at them, so the many many shots of Leona, her friends and family and a few other famous faces are literally the cutest things ever to look through. Nice touch.

Overall, I think this book was put together in a smart, clever way to ensure it came across as intimate, informative and interesting to the readers. If that was the specific aim, it was completely successful. It really sold Leona in a positive light, just by presenting her to the world, as herself. No gimmicks.

Leona Lewis has always been one of my favourite female vocalists and this book has made me fall even more in love with her. Her beauty surely isn’t only skin deep.

If you want inspiration, I recommend this book. ‘Dreams’ has reminded me to never stop dreaming and also to dream big. I’m getting there!

 

Peace&Love.

Paula ox’